Christopher Coyne

Christopher Coyne

F.A. Harper Professor of Economics at the Mercatus Center
George Mason University

Christopher Coyne is the F.A. Harper Professor of Economics at the Mercatus Center and an economics professor at George Mason University. Dr. Coyne is also the North American Editor of The Review of Austrian Economics and contributes to the blog Coordination Problem.

In 2008, he was named the Hayek Fellow at the London School of Economics, and in 2010 he was a Visiting Scholar at the Social Philosophy & Policy Center at Bowling Green State University.

Dr. Coyne is the author of After War: The Political Economy of Exporting Democracy  (2007, Stanford University Press), Media, Development and Institutional Change   (co-authored with Peter Leeson, 2009, Edward Elgar Publishing), and the editor (with Rachel Mathers) of The Handbook on the Political Economy of War  (2011, Edward Elgar Publishing).

He received his Ph.D. in Economics from George Mason University.

Blog Posts

The black hole of Pentagon finance

The Pentagon suppressed a 2015 study exposing $125 billion—yes, billion—in administrative waste, over a five year period, in order to protect its own budget from being slashed.

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Some economics of Christmas

The holiday season is a time for love and cheer. So this Christmas, as you’re huddled in front of fire drinking eggnog and singing carols, be thankful for the wealth and opportunity that the free market has generated, and signal your love by giving a gift that matters.

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Programs

Foreign Policy

Videos

Foreign Policy Explained, Ep. 13: The Best Way To Lift Humanity Out Of Poverty

There are ways to improve foreign societies that don’t involve military intervention or foreign assistance. If the desired goal of invading other nations and humanitarian aid is to improve international human…

Foreign Policy Explained, Ep. 12: Can Humanitarians Help Economic Development?

How can we actually stimulate economic development in poverty stricken nations? Just about everyone would agree that humanitarians have a worthy goal and that their hearts are in the right…

Foreign Policy Explained, Ep. 11: Should We Privatize National Defense?

Is national defense a “public good?” Professor Chris Coyne outlines what it means to be a public good and raises the question of whether we should privatize our National Defense/National…

Foreign Policy Explained, Ep. 10: Does Humanitarian Aid Work?

What is it about well intentioned, well-funded, state led, humanitarian aid programs that makes them fail so miserably? The truth is, humanitarian aid intended to alleviate suffering often fails, and in…

Foreign Policy Explained, Ep. 9: Is Nation-Building Worth The Cost?

Was the Iraq war worth it? The U.S went into Iraq under the pretense of weapons of mass destruction, but another reason was the effort to show Iraqis the power…

Foreign Policy Explained, Ep. 7: 6 Reasons Why Libertarians want Foreign Policy Reform

Do the benefits of foreign intervention outweigh the costs? Foreign intervention is a source of much disagreement among those who believe in a limited government. If the role of government is…

Foreign Policy, Ep. 6: How The Free Market System Can End The Military Industrial Complex

The Pentagon fails to keep track of its financial resources and expenditures in any meaningful way. For military contractor’s, profit and loss are determined not by the market, but by…

Foreign Policy, Ep. 5: What is the Military Industrial Complex?

When government and private military contractors get too close, “People are shipped off to fight and die without making our nation any safer”. Unfortunately as a result of the Military Industrial…

How the Paris Terror Attack (2015) Could Curb Human Rights in 90 Seconds

The world was deeply saddened by recent attacks on Paris. France has responded by declaring a state of emergency at home, and has increased its bombing of ISIS-held territory abroad.  

The Economics of Valentine’s Day

It’s Valentine’s Day, and there’s nothing that Prof. Chris Coyne loves more than free markets. In fact, our ability to appreciate and enjoy Valentine’s Day is the direct result of…

Occupy Wall Street and Student Loans

According to Prof. Chris Coyne, one of the main concerns of the Occupy Wall Street movement is the rising cost of college and student loans. If student loans were forgiven,…

Makers vs. Takers at Occupy Wall Street

The Occupy Wall Street protests have popularized the distinction between the lowest 99% and the highest 1% of income earners. Prof. Chris Coyne suggests that a distinction between makers and…

Occupy Wall Street & Capitalism: A Professor’s Response

The Occupy Wall Street movement expresses valid frustrations, but do the protesters aim their accusations in the wrong direction? Economics Professor Chris Coyne draws the distinction between crony capitalism and legitimate…

After War: The Political Economy of Exporting Democracy

From the IHS Vault: Prof. Christopher Coyne lends an economist’s eye to the subject of foreign policy, specifically post-conflict reconstruction and “exporting democracy.” He examines recent U.S. policies, and suggests…