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Category Archive: Liberty

  1. Rise of the Mockingjay: From Ferguson to Hong Kong

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    In the Hunger Games, Katniss Everdeen becomes the Mockingjay–a symbol of hope and rebellion for the people of Panem. In today’s world, where new technology enables government surveillance and censorship, citizens are able to fight back by using that same technology to organize and rebel against abuse of power. Both in the fictional dystopia of the Hunger Games and the real, near-dystopian rights violations faced by people across the world today, the ideas of freedom catch fire, spreading faster than governments can stamp them out.

  2. Guilty Til Proven Rich – Drug War Stories (Ep. 8) with Alex Kreit

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    You know what they say about assumptions, right? Well, what if our criminal justice system worked off that flawed system? Right now police officers are making wild assumptions about what a lot of money is, and what a drug dealer is supposed to look like. Listen to Professor Alex Kreit as he explains why our drug laws make no sense, and what you need to do to avoid getting hassled by ‘the man.’

  3. University Privilege – Drug War Stories (Ep. 7) with Alex Kreit

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    When you think about going to college or university, crime is usually not your first thought. But with sexual assault, robbery, and especially drug related arrests, maybe it’s time to rethink everything you thought you knew about campus safety. While courts don’t often associate dorm rooms as a crime neighborhood, the danger is there, and Professor Alex Kreit is here to discuss what that means for keeping you away from your R.A’s office, or worse.

  4. Don’t Buy Drugs At The Mall – Drug War Stories (Ep. 6) with Alex Kreit

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    Right now, while your car or home is being broken into (hopefully not, though) there is a police officer sitting inside a mall drinking an Orange Julius, trying to convince impressionable teenagers to buy drugs.  Professor Alex Kreit offers an inside look at some of the strangest drug enforcement techniques cops are using right now to catch minor drug users.

  5. Are Cops Confused? – Drug War Stories (Ep. 5) with Alex Kreit

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    If you caught someone with their hand in the cookie jar, you wouldn’t let them keep the cookie and only step in once the entire jar is empty to establish a stronger case, would you? Well, right now, that is exactly what the police are doing with drug offenders.  Go inside the strange world of  drug law loopholes, exemptions, and monkey shines with Professor Alex Kreit.

  6. All The Cool Cops Are Doing It – Drug War Stories (Ep. 4) with Alex Kreit

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    21 Jump Street isn’t just in your Blu-ray player. Right now, young-looking police officers are infiltrating America’s high schools, looking to break up major crime rings. One problem: they’re usually doing more harm than good. So if you see Channing Tatum or Johnny Depp wandering the halls of your high school, before you ask for their autograph, make sure you’re informed of the real ways cops are taking advantage of today’s teenagers.

  7. If You Give A Cop Some Coke – Drug War Stories (Ep. 1) with Alex Kreit

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    Everyone knows the dangers of buying drugs. But did you know there’s a way to buy drugs and have cops actually thank you for it? In an in-depth analysis of the United States’ current drug laws and all of its weird rules, loony litigation and strange loopholes, Professor Alex Kreit takes you behind the scenes and reveals some facts that may surprise you.

  8. 3 Things You NEED To Know About Mandatory Prison Sentencing

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    Our three most recent presidents have admitted to committing drug offenses in their youth, though they didn’t pay for their indiscretions with jail time. But most people caught up in our criminal justice system aren’t so lucky. Perhaps the worst aspect of the flawed system is mandatory minimum sentences. Consider Weldon Angelos, one victim — a former record producer who won’t get out of jail until he’s eighty and has served a sentence of more than twice what the hijacker of a plane would face. His crime? Selling marijuana twice.
    Alex Kreit, criminal law professor at Thomas Jefferson School of Law, explains three reasons why mandatory minimums are really, really, really bad. For one thing, the sentences can be longer than those for more serious crimes. Second, they get the wrong people, despite the intentions of lawmakers. Third, if the goal is to reduce drug use, they fail on their own terms. Among their targets in practice are people who have been convicted of such minor offenses as possession for personal use. Drugs are as plentiful as ever.

  9. V for Venezuela

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    Tired of the corruption, high crime, and poor state of the economy in Venezuela, students and other citizens are taking to the streets to protest. What kind of ideas inspire regular citizens to risk so much in the face of a tyrannical government?

    Source footage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFS6cP9auDc

    Disclaimer: Learn Liberty is an educational project and does not endorse any policy, politician, or political party. Learn Liberty does not endorse violence of any kind.

    “The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.” ― James Madison

  10. We Are All Ukrainians

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    The anti-government protests and demonstrations in Ukraine have been flooding the news lately. But what is it all about? What ideas inspire these people to stand tall against their oppressive government?

    Disclaimer: Learn Liberty is an educational project and does not endorse any policy, politician, or political party. Learn Liberty does not endorse violence of any kind.

    “I mean let anyone do anything he pleases that’s peaceful or creative; let there be no organized restraint against anything but fraud, violence, misrepresentation, predation; let anyone deliver mail or educate or preach his religion or whatever, so long as it’s peaceful.” – Leonard Read

    SOURCE: http://youtu.be/Hvds2AIiWLA

  11. Debate – What Would Happen if America Opened its Borders?

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    The United States has laws in place to limit the number of immigrants granted entry. How many immigrants should be allowed to call America home? Bryan Caplan, professor of economics at George Mason University, argues that the United States should have open borders. Jan Ting, professor of law at Temple University, argues that there need to be limits on the number of immigrants.

    In this clip, Prof. Ting argues that open borders would result in an enormous increase in the number of immigrants to the United States. He points out that there are so many opportunities here that people would come in huge numbers from less developed countries. The strain on the United States infrastructure and environment could be enormous.

    In his response, Prof. Caplan argues that the fact people would want to come in such great numbers is, in his mind, an argument favoring open borders. People should be living in places where they can achieve their potential. For many people around the world, this means they need to move. Would this have effects on the U.S. economy? Absolutely. Prof. Caplan argues that in the short run, housing prices would probably increase, for example. In addition, we may see a move to having personal servants, as many of the low-skilled workers in the world have skill sets that fall below the lowest-skilled workers in the United States. To offset pressures on the environment, Prof. Caplan recommends increasing costs for pollution and other environmental hazards.
    What do you think? Do you think the fact that many people would want to immigrate to the United States is an argument in favor or against opening the borders?