Learn Liberty

Category Archive: Spontaneous Order

  1. How Much Immigration Is Too Much Immigration?

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    The United States has laws in place to limit the number of immigrants granted entry. How many immigrants should be allowed to call America home? Bryan Caplan, professor of economics at George Mason University, argues that the United States should have open borders. Jan Ting, professor of law at Temple University, argues that there need to be limits on the number of immigrants.

    In this clip from the debate, Prof. Ting argues that the risks of trying an open border policy are too great. He points out that the U.S. population is estimated to grow at a fast rate in the next 50 years and through the end of the century if we do nothing. He is concerned that allowing free immigration will overwhelm U.S. infrastructure and cause too much environmental damage.

    Prof. Caplan responds by arguing that the market will ration immigration just as it rations anything else. Indeed, the idea of immigration without quotas is overwhelming if we do not consider how market forces will play a role. He argues that we can have open borders without fear because of the power of the market.

  2. From Rags to Riches: The Cayman Islands Revolution

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    Enroll in the program here!

    The rule of law, Hayek wrote, is “a rule concerning what the law ought to be”: It ought to be general and abstract; equally applied, with legal privileges for none; certain, not subject to arbitrary changes; and just. In this Learn Liberty Academy, Andrew Morriss sets sail to show how the law of the Cayman Islands conforms with Hayek’s ideals, how it got that way through astute political entrepreneurship, and how the world at large benefits from its legal wisdom. The benefits of Caymanian rule of law are so diffuse and far-reaching that we can even attribute the American poor’s high consumption of healthcare to it.  Embark on Morriss’s expedition — read, watch lectures, and discuss!

    Song credit: “Coconut Water” – Dan O’Connor

    Archival images courtesy of the Cayman Islands National Archive

  3. Recycle Smarter Than A Third Grader!

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    Reduce! Reuse! Recycle! All right? Maybe — maybe not, says scholar Daniel K. Benjamin. Making an unused tissue out of a used one wastes resources and hardly benefits the environment. Melting and casting aluminum cans, though, both saves resources and benefits the environment. But you don’t need to exhort the aluminum company to save those resources: saving scraps is in its own interest. So why does it take a lesson from your third-grade teacher to get you to recycle household waste?

  4. The Relationship Between Commerce and Crime | Off the Clock Economist Explores

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    Professor Daniel D’Amico interviews a New Orleans business owner about crime in the city after Hurricane Katrina. They observe that local businesses can play an important role in reducing crime and increasing the safety of communities. Entrepreneurs and businesses create more connections between people, offer support and economic opportunities, and provide what urbanist Jane Jacobs called “eyes on the street.”

  5. How to Make a Criminal Cocktail | Off the Clock Economist Explores

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    With a social-capital-inducing King Cake in tow, Off the Clock Economist Dan D’Amico heads out to a backyard bar. Discover how to make a New Orleans Sazerac, which many say was the very first cocktail ever invented. Why? Keep watching to learn how the criminalization of alcohol in the United States forever changed the way we consume liquor. There is no tastier way to figure-out how social capital, unintended consequences, and government intervention helped the Big Easy create this famous drink – and don’t worry, the recipe is in the video too!

    Check out Rob Hahne’s shop: Homestead NOLA

  6. The Gumbo Recipe that Works for Everybody | Off the Clock Economist

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    Off the Clock Economist Dan D’Amico is still going strong in his pursuit to know all there is to know about New Orleans. Join him as he learns how to make gumbo, the signature dish of the Big Easy. This delicious food will get him thinking too, so sit tight as he delves into topics like spontaneous order, social capital, and America’s melting pot. How do all these things relate? What do they all have to do with gumbo? How does that tie into NOLA? Keep watching and find out – no matter what, you will learn how to make some fantastic food.

    Checkout Langlois Culinary Crossroads!

  7. Bars and Brass Bands in the Big Easy | Off the Clock Economist Explores

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    What if we told you that the decadent and debaucherous nature of New Orleans made it easier – not harder, for the Big Easy to come back strong after Hurricane Katrina? Follow our Off the Clock Economist, Dan D’Amico, as he explores the underlying social capital of jazz music, parades, and much more. You will also get to learn what Faubourg Marigny is, hear some history on the Rebirth Brass Band, and discover a bar that warns, “Be Nice or Go Home.” This is New Orleans like you’ve never seen it.

  8. Off the clock, this Prof parties in New Orleans. Check it out!

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    New Orleans, the one and only! So much culture, so many parties, so many parades, so much food, and so much more. Where does it all come from? How did it survive the destruction brought on by Hurricane Katrina? Join Off the Clock Economist Dan D’Amico as he punches out from Loyola University to tramp around the Big Easy. Get ready to discover:

    - The social capital behind booking a local band
    - How spontaneous order makes Mardi Gras even more fun
    - Why cultural economics matters when you’re at the bar

    So follow the tattooed guy as he learns about the enduring social ties and financial logic of brass bands, legendary watering holes, and enticing parades.

  9. How Eating Babies Strengthens New Orleans | Off the Clock Economist Explains

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    Off the Clock Economist Dan D’Amico is at it again exploring Louisiana and the culture of Mardi Gras. This time he will explain the social capital behind eating the babies that are placed in each “King Cake” made in New Orleans. Join him as he gets to the bottom of it at the Swiss Confectionary Bakery on St. Charles Avenue. Thought you couldn’t learn about social theory from a tattooed man wandering around the Big Easy? Think again.

  10. Virtue & Vice at Mardi Gras | Off the Clock Economist Explains

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    Off the Clock Economist Dan D’Amico gallivants through Mardi Gras festivities in New Orleans. Discover what Balinese cock fighting and lavish parades in the French Quarter have in common: keeping corruption low and citizen cohesion high.

    Did you know that the breast, beads, and booze of New Orleans point to something else that just a party? This famous get-together builds social capital and local knowledge through “deep play”. Get to know the culture and community that comes with one city’s most legendary party as Professor D’Amico leaves the podium to dig into the economics of a topic untouched by the classroom.

  11. V for Venezuela

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    Tired of the corruption, high crime, and poor state of the economy in Venezuela, students and other citizens are taking to the streets to protest. What kind of ideas inspire regular citizens to risk so much in the face of a tyrannical government?

    Source footage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFS6cP9auDc

    Disclaimer: Learn Liberty is an educational project and does not endorse any policy, politician, or political party. Learn Liberty does not endorse violence of any kind.

    “The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.” ― James Madison

  12. We Are All Ukrainians

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    The anti-government protests and demonstrations in Ukraine have been flooding the news lately. But what is it all about? What ideas inspire these people to stand tall against their oppressive government?

    Disclaimer: Learn Liberty is an educational project and does not endorse any policy, politician, or political party. Learn Liberty does not endorse violence of any kind.

    “I mean let anyone do anything he pleases that’s peaceful or creative; let there be no organized restraint against anything but fraud, violence, misrepresentation, predation; let anyone deliver mail or educate or preach his religion or whatever, so long as it’s peaceful.” – Leonard Read

    SOURCE: http://youtu.be/Hvds2AIiWLA